About your Search

20120701
20120731
SHOW
Today 161
Book TV 111
( more )
STATION
CNN 506
FOXNEWSW 502
CNNW 501
FOXNEWS 486
MSNBCW 415
MSNBC 409
KGO (ABC) 259
SFGTV2 253
CSPAN2 251
WMAR (ABC) 241
WRC 236
WBAL (NBC) 230
CSPAN3 218
WUSA (CBS) 206
WJLA 201
CSPAN 192
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 7469
Spanish 29
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 7,501 (some duplicates have been removed)
and lost but nevertheless changed political history. we feature former governor of new york al smith who was the democratic presidential candidate in 1928. this two-hour program was recorded at the new york state assembly chamber in albany, new york. each sunday at this time through labor day weekend, you can watch "the contenders" on "american history tv" on c-span3. >>> i come here tonight to the al smith dinner knowing i'm the underdog in these final weeks. but if you know where to look, there are signs of hope. there are signs of hope, even in the most unexpected places, even in this room full of proud manhattan democrats, i can't shake that feeling that some people here are pulling for me. [ cheers and applause ] i'm delighted to see you here tonight, hillary. >> i was thrilled to get this invitation and i feel right at home here because it's often been said that i share the politics of salford e. smith and the ears of alfred e. newman. it is an honor to be here with al smith. i obviously never knew your great grandfather. from everything senator mccain has told me, the two of them
sober papers like "the new york times." and it basically discredits. it's one of the things that seriously discredits old-style, super-partisan journalism when -- the president got killed because they -- of the way they whipped up the people. >>> you're watching american history tv all weekend, every weekend on c-span3. for more information, follow us on twitter @c-spanhistory. >>> now, the contenders, our 14-week series on key political figures who ran for president and lost but nevertheless changed political history. we feature former governor of new york al smith who was the democratic presidential candidate in 1928. this two-hour program was recorded at the new york state assembly chamber in albany, new york. each sunday at this time through labor day weekend, you can watch "the contenders" on "american history tv" on c-span3. >>> i come here tonight to the al smith dinner knowing i'm the underdog in these final weeks. but if you know where to look, there are signs of hope. there are signs of hope, even in the most unexpected places, even in this room full of proud manha
ticket in 1920 goes down in new york state by over 1 million votes. smith only loses by 75,000. that's where one famous person said to him, it was like swimming up niagara falls and you came the closest that anybody ever did. he comes back in 1922 and wins a squeaker. then in 1924 he starts to add to his totals and he wins against teddy roosevelt jr. and then ogden mills in '26. he didn't have light opponents, either. it was only in the 1920s when he terms start to pay -- come to fruition. in 1919, 1920 he's seen as the accidental governor. >> 1920 women get the vote. does that make a difference in al smith's electoral career? >> al smith is interesting because, as john indicated before, he actually staffs a lot of his inner circle with women. at a moment when not many figures are doing that. particularly reformers out of new york, many of whom go on to be pretty significant figures in the new deal. frances perkins who becomes fdr's secretary of labor is a close ally of smith. he's actually got a fairly sort of progressive outlook on women in government. i mean, the advent of the wom
. at a moment when not many figures are doing that. particularly reformers out of new york, many of whom go on to be pretty significant figures in the new deal. frances perkins who becomes fdr's secretary of labor is a close ally of smith. he's actually got a fairly sort of progressive outlook on women in government. i mean, the advent of the women's vote doesn't immediately have a huge impact certainly on national politics. it ultimately begins to build. but it doesn't have the impact that many people are predicting. and in terms of new york state politics, i mean, john would know this better than i. but i don't have the perception that it really transforms his candidacy. >> not at first. in fact, smith was not in favor of women suffrage. he changed his mind. in fact, smith's mother said, i'll never vote. there's no need for me to vote. and she does. she casts her first ballot, i believe, for her son for governor. but smith's hook on women's suffrage is, he gets bill mos cowits and a lot of these people involved and he starts to realize, these are new voters. and they said, how do i talk t
to build. but it doesn't have the impact that many people are predicting. and in terms of new york state politics, i mean, john would know this better than i. but i don't have the perception that it really transforms his candidacy. >> not at first. in fact, smith was not in favor of women suffrage. he changed his mind. in fact, smith's mother said, i'll never vote. there's no need for me to vote. and she does. she casts her first ballot, i believe, for her son for governor. but smith's hook on women's suffrage is, he gets belle moskowitz and a lot of these people involved and he starts to realize, these are new voters. and they said, how do i talk to these people? they said, talk to them like you would talk to a chamber of commerce. like you would anybody else in a campaign. smith starts to realize that women suffrage is a good idea. i can enlighten these people. i can get them to vote democratic. that's where he gets the brain trust and many of the people who work for him for governor, for president, a lot of reformers that become sturdy supporters of the democratic party. smith capital
. you know, he thought he knew new york state was this -- in fact, when he first went to the assembly and started traveling the state, he realized i've seen a lot more just in my neighborhood than what these people have seen. but he couldn't bring everybody down to new york, to manhattan, although he brought many members of the assembly. this is how america really is. it's this melting pot, and that caused a lot of problems. same of that came back to zenophobia. it was almost a way for them to say you're foreign, you're not like us. >> we'll get to calls in just a minute. he went to work in about 1886 at 13 years old. where did he go to work? >> he had probably one of the toughest careers that i've ever heard of. he starts by leaving early and he goes and sells newspapers. after school, i'm going to sell newspapers. he makes a few dollars that way. it's not enough. his mother had to go and get a job the day that they buried his father. she comes back from the funeral, goes back to the lady of the umbrella factory where she worked prior to meeting al smith sr. to get her job back. it's
guests is east greenbush new york, wayne, you're on c-span. wayne, you with us? >> i'm here. howdy. the question is twofold. one, just in what al smith's role and commitment was to both the new york state civil service system and labor. and how he championed that when he campaigned on the federal level. what specific things did he do to help reform new york state politics and particularly the civil service system and his commitment to labor? what did he do for the labor movement in new york state and later on the federal -- >> thank you, wayne. john evers. >> that's a really good point that always separated al smith when it came to labor issues. in 1911 there was the famous triangle shirtwaist fire factory down in manhattan. smith was on the commission that was passed by the legislature to study labor law. and smith drew closer. he became good friends with francis perkins, schneiderman. in past in this very chamber, the labor laws which would regulate fire escapes, hours of service, health codes, workman's compensation. hand in hand with that probably was the advent of civil servic
in new york in the middle of the 19th century. what were conditions like, the lower east side is famous during these years, particularly as you get into the late 19th century as being the single most crowded place on the face of the earth. >> the question is twofold. one, i am interested in what al smith's role and commitment was to both the new york state's civil service system and labor, and how he championed that when he campaigns on the federal level. what specific things did he do to help reform new york state politics and particularly the civil service system and his commitment to labor? what did he do for the labor movement in new york state? >> thank you. and there's not much tenement regulation at that point. there are not much by way of sanitary regulations. it's kind of a free for all. so you have enormously crowded conditions. often you have big problems with disease on the lower east side because sanitary conditions are poor. but in many people's memories you also have very tight-knit ethnic neighborhoods which had some powerful institutions. sometimes churches. >>> the mos
foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america." his face is fresh, but his party is old. the mexican election produces a return to the party that ruled for 71 years. now, can he fixed the drug war? an afghan policeman trains his drug -- trains his gun on the people sent to kill him. raising a lot of questions about the mission. and taking a trip on the a train, join us on a colorful and noisy ride on new york's most colorful subway line. >> welcome to our viewers around the growth -- around the globe. if confirmed, the party that has ruled the country with a tight grip for most of the last century is back in power, but the slim margin of victory for enrique pena nieto is not the one that he had hoped for. his m
bridal design company right here in new york. it was an interesting company with what i thought were really fabulous designs, but something on the business side seemed to be missing. and we found out that the company was in trouble. that's why we decided to step in and give the owners a "your business" makeover. ♪ >> when brothers steve and gregory started their bridal depress company, fancy new york in 2008, they couldn't believe the initial reaction. at their very first trade show, while they appeared sneaker, the bridal editors took notice. >> tall, elegant, woman walked right over to us. i love that you have sleeves and collars. tell me the story. >> that's when i knew there was something about this business that's going to work. >> fancy new york was doing something different. nowhere in the collection would you find the commonplace long strapless dress that is most brides were wearing. their look was vintage inspired, comfortable, primarily tea-length dresses. >> the mood of our brand was to have a nostalgic approach to dressing on your wedding day. >> the business was a drea
implemented in new york state as well. >> we've heard from john evers who is the former new york state assembly historian and also from beverly gage, history professor at yale university about the fdr/al smith relationship. landon he supported in 1936 and wendell willky in 1940, he supported over fdr. in fact, here is al smith on the radio talking about his support for wendell wilkin. >> i'd just like to make a little observation. i'd like to know what could be going through the mind of the 16 million men that are in the draft. i wonder if they're not saying to themselves, if this becomes serious, if it becomes necessary that we have to face an enemy, who would you soon to be behind, the third-term candidate or a wilke? in my opinion, we only hope for the people whose the election of wendell wilke who believes -- who believes in the constitution of the united states and the principles upon which it was founded. when he is chosen to guide this nation, then and then only will the stars and stripes again wave over the land of the free and the home of the brave. >> beverly gage, what's you
. i think he went through something personally at that point and his circle in new york as he becomes head of the empire state building and as he begins to solidify these alliances with businessmen, that really becomes his world in the 1930s. >> and we're going to talk about that part of his life in just a minute. but we have another questioner here in the new york state assembly. tell us who you are and what you're doing here tonight. >> good evening. my name is sharita. i'm a professor at schenectady community college. i teach administrative law. as my students and i are talking about government and how it's getting larger, discuss state and federal agencies, we talk a lot about immigration reform as it relates to department of homeland security. and so as we're talking about al smith and his background and having come from new york city, south street sea port, being raised amongst a lot of ethnically diverse groups, i wonder what immigration policy would look like today for, you know, governor al smith. what would he think in terms of, one, the ethnicity of the immigrants coming in
specially at that point and that his circle in new york, as he is beginning to be the head of the new york state building and the alliances of the business men, that becomes his world in the 1930s. >> we will talk about that part of his life in just a minute. but we have another questioner here in the new york state assembly. tell us who you are and what you are doing here tonight? >> i'm a professor at a community college. i teach administrative law. as my students and i talk about government and how government are getting larger and we discuss state and federal agencies we talk about immigration reform as it relates to the department of homeland security, we talk about al smith and his background and having come from new york city, being raised among a lot of ethnically diverse groups, what would an immigration policy look like today in terms of al smith. one the ethic groups that are coming in are different than what he grew up with, and largely we are looking for policies in today's immigration platform that deals with labor issues. whether or not people who have been here illegally sh
, this is "democracy now!" >> ♪ this land is your land, this land is my land from california to the new york island from the redwood forests to the gulf stream waters this and land was made for you and me ♪ >> "democracy now!" special on the life, politics and music of woody guthrie, the dustbowl troubadour. born a hundred years ago on july 14, 1912, we will speak with his daughter nora guthrie and granddaughter anna canoni, and be joined by woody guthrie- inspired musician, steve earle. >> woody is 100 years old. he invented my job. i am grateful for that. i have a job. there's a lot of people that cannot say that right now. this is music for times exactly like these. happy birthday, woody. >> legendary folk singer pete seeger. >> woody took over and entranced everybody, not just with singing but storytelling. >> i come from oklahoma. u.s. and will? go down in the ground and the some oil. if you want lead, go down and get some lead. if you want coal, we have: oklahoma. if you want food, clothes, grocers, just go in the hole and stay there. >> happy one of your birth date, woody guthrie. all of t
-seller lists of the "new york times" and amazon! and fulfilling my life long dream of ripping "good night moon" a new one. (laughter) in your face, quiet old lady whispering hush. (laughter) but, of course, the question remains is my book a classic. does it occupy the same rarefied air as the "brothers care mat solve." "the great gatsby" or the flaming novel of lust and slavery "dragonard" by rupert gilchrist, author of the "dragonard" saga. of course, any craftsman must stand the test of time. my book has been on sale for ten weeks, time's up. and the literary community has responded with a resounding sure because my book is being displayed at philadelphia's little known rosenbach museum and library. (cheers and applause) i'll take what i can get. (laughter) this is who's honoring me now. (cheers and applause) on tonight's episode of who's honoring me now we travel to the rosenbach museum in philadelphia. >> the rosenbach quite simply is one of the greatest collections of rare books and manuscripts anywhere in the world. >> stephen: the curator is responsible for preserving some of history's
>> the only freshman to try to come across from paris to new york, a harder route. he was very romantic and he was thought of as the glamorous night of the air. he also had flown in a couple of hollywood movies, one of which would not be released until after his death. their were no complications in this. it was easy to understand these people as they were presented. the storylines were very simple. because of that they became infested with the hopes and dreams of millions and their victories and finished became our own. you've got to remember that at this time lindbergh was not ordained to win, not at all. he showed up during the last come he showed up a week before took off. the other flyers have been covered to death, so he was new which made him news, so there was a lot of coverage about lindbergh, and he was young and this was a young age, the jazz age. reporters went absolutely nuts about him, but everyone other flyers, at one time or another had been declared the front runner. every one of the flyers the press speculated was going to be the one that one. and everyone oth
>>> marketing money, social media, health care. those are all hot topics here at the "new york times" small business summit. we'll sit down to talk to attendees. >>> plus a look at one of the oldest new york-run businesses. it's time to make money coming up next on "your business." >>> hi, there, everyone. i'm j.j. ramberg and welcome to "your business." where we give you tips and advice to help your business grow. what better place to do that than here at the 2012 "new york times" small business summit. small business owners, investors and business journalists have all gathered here today to network and talk about pressing issues like funding, marketing and utilizing social media. ♪ >>> the majority of small businesses shut down before being around for five years. only a third of them make it to ten years. so what are the odds then of a company being around 150 years through five generations of the same family? well, you're going to love meeting the mcalisters. a new york family that knows how to beat the odds. >> okay, jeff, haul the line in. ellen is getting in position. o
to the idea, you know that statue that i was going to build in egypt? it really needs to be in new york haaror. >> i love hearing about his journey across america also and the way it had even more richness to it than toqueville's journey and the way in which he went from east to west and then a different journey back, that he was really seeing america as something much different and more progressive than what france had to offer at the time, that he came to see this as only possible true home of the statue. i love his account and that even the rocky mountains were terrifying to him because he had never seen anything like that before. >> yeah, yeah. there's a group of people there, aamerican foot in the united states and the only thing they knew about the united states was what they read in books and some newspapers so when bartholdi came here for the first time in 1871 he figured out immediately that the statue was going to go up in new york harbor. he found the island where he was going to put it, but he didn't have any takers, nobody was intereste interested: here was a guy who no one knew,
>>> marketing money, social media, health care. those are all hot topics at the "new york times" small business summit. we'll sit down and talk to participants and attendees. plus a look at one of the oldest family-run businesses. it's time to make money coming up next on "your business." >>> small businesses are revitalizing the economy, and american express open is here to help. that's why we are proud to present "your business," on msnbc. >>> hi, there. i'm j.j. ramberg. welcome to "your business." we give you tips and advice to help your business grow. what better place to do that than the 2012 new york times small business summit. small business owners and business journalists have gathered to network and talk about pressing issues like funding, marketing and utilizing social media. >> the majority of small businesses shut down before being around for five years. only a third of them make it to ten years. what are the odds of a company being around 150 years, through five generations of the same family? you will love meeting the mcallisters. a new york family that knows how
from new york for his hard work and leadership on this legislation, and with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from north carolina. mr. butterfield: thank you, mr. speaker. at this time i'd like to yield such time as he may consume to the gentleman from new york, mr. owens. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new york is recognized. mr. owens: thank you, mr. speaker. thank you to my colleague. i'm having a little trouble with the microphone. here we go. mr. speaker, i rise today to join mr. harper as an original co-sponsor to offer legislation to repeal an outdated mandate on auto dealerships across the country. under current rules, the national highway traffic safety administration is required to distribute a booklet on auto insurance costs to dealers. those dealers are required to keep the booklet onhand and made available to prospective customers. i had the honor to represent two dealers. working alongside them helped me better understand the automobile retail market and the pressures dealers
? tonight the man behind the video that's gone viral. >>> from nbc news world head quarters in new york, this is "nbc nightly news" with lester holt. >> good evening. as this long holiday week draws to an end, so does the crippling heatwave that has taken 66 lives since late june. temperatures dropped to the mid 80s in parts of the midwest that only a few days were sweltering under triple-digit temps. however, it remained dangerously hot further east in places like washington, d.c. which got into the 100s for the fourth consecutive day. we are still under excessive heat advisories and warnings, and around half a dozen daily heat records were set today as well, though far fewer than yesterday when over 200 daily records and ten all-time records were set. we'll check in with the weather channel in a moment. we begin our coverage here in new york tonight with nbc's michelle franzen. good evening. >> reporter: temperatures still hit 90 degrees here in new york city, but about ten degrees cooler than a day ago. that drew out more people here to central park, one of the cities here on the eas
than half-a-million visitors each day. kristen gives us an insider's tour of one of new york's most magnificent landmarks. [ loudspeaker chatter ] >> welcome to grand central terminal, the busiest train station in the country. >> grand central was built because there was a new technology in the mid-1800s, which was trains. [ train whistle blows ] and it was rapidly replacing the earlier modes of transportation. in order to understand theation. importance of grand central, you have to understand the importance of the railroads to the united states and to the world at that time. before the railroads came along, the only way to get across the country or from any point was either by horse-and-carriage or by canal, which was very slow. the railroads revolutionized the ability to move quickly across the country, and they became an extraordinarily powerful business. >> so powerful, in fact, that in 1947, over 65 million people -- the equivalent of almost half our nation's population at the time -- passed through grand central in just one year. that gave birth to a popular saying in the 194
uno de los uniformados disparÓ. >>> vamos a una pausa, en instantes revelan que new york tiene que cumplir con una cuota de deportados. >>> nb en new york restaurante ofrece ademÁs de un rico menÚ clases de inglÉs. >>> mandan a recoger 30.000 libras de carne molida. >>> tributo al Último disidente cubano, oswaldo paya. >>> los tendremos mÁs adelante en pantalla. grupos defensores de los inmigrantes revelaron informaciÓn que hasta ahora era manejada por ice. por elevada cuota de deportaciÓns que le piden a new york. >>> comenzamos con el ejemplo que le va a pasar a un inmigrante que estÁ en prisiÓn y serÁ deportado al salir en libertad. >>> este ejemplo es parte del estudio donde muestra vÍnculos entre el sistema judicial de new york y ice. >>> el 92% de los detenidos no ganan sus casos, pierden en sus casos y son deportados. >>> algo que ato ererroriza a l indocumentados de new york. >>> la gestiÓn del seÑor obama que son cuatro veces mÁs las deportaciones, sin respeto a los que no tienen rÉcord criminal. >>> entre octubre del 2005 y diciembre del 2010, 34 extranjerm
will love meeting the mcallisters. a new york family that knows how to beat the odds. >> okay, jeff, haul the line in. line's there and ellen's getting in position. okay. >> brian mcallister's family name has dotted the new york harbor since 1864. >> a company that lasted for 150 years in the family. and for that, you've got to be lucky. >> that was the year his great grandfather, james mcallister started mcallister towing, helping big ships navigate to shore. do you tnk that it is business sense or pure luck that it's been in the family that long? >> there are several things that have to happen. one, you can't make too much money. if you make too much money, everybody wants to sell it and get rich. if you don't make enough money, they leave. >> you mayay he found a sweet spot for the company. somewhere between too much success on the one hand, and too much stress on the other. >> the most efficient boat in the world and the lines are like a yacht. >> not as official -- >> james mcallister started it in new york's south seaport as a lone immigrant with a single cargo boat or lighter, he l
unveiling in new york harbor in 1886. this is about one hour. >> good >> good evening, and welcome. i am the director of collections and exhibitions at the museum of jewish heritage. i am happy to introduce a brand new book, and just a note but we are being taped by c-span, so when we get questions at the end, we will want to entertain them, so i will call you at that point. will want to entertain them, so i will call you at that point. he is the director of french studies at nyu. he is the author of five other books. in 1999 he received the distinguished teaching award. we are particularly lucky to be one of the sites to discuss his new book, and this is something we have been looking forward to for over a year now. he has been indelibly linked with the poem at the statue of liberty. good he has worked on the exhibition on display until the end of 2012, and i am pleased he here to share his inside. one reason we decided to do this is this is a big year. we are into the year 125 years into the dedication, so it is a perfect time for your book to come out, and i think very few people rlly
of mood control? we'll ask new york magazine journalist ariel levy and washington psychiatrist dr. brian doyle. >> a.d.m. the nature of what's to come. >> welcome. ariel levy, you authored a cover story for "new york magazine" which we see here "what are you on?" and you described new york today to -- you say sound the alarm, there is a new drug epidemic in town and most of the city wants in on it. in certain circles of new york, it is regular table conversation. we have entered the golden age of self-medication. drugs have become like hair products or cosmetics. this is brain styling, not mind altering, and you have a serious point to make there, but what is the extent of what you see going on in new york? >> well, i mean, i think new york is the same town that brought you woody allen and brought you everybody having a psychiatrist. there not a great deal of stigma to being neurotic in new york. it is accepted to the point of maybe being desirable in certain circles. i think now that these medications are more common, new york is the place where people are going to be comfortable with i
. this system has worked in new york for years. i think it can work in san francisco. president chiu: next speaker. >> good afternoon. i am here to speak on behalf -- [inaudible] i am here to speak on behalf on the executive -- president chiu: we are having a hearing on ranked-choice voting. we will have general comments, so that would be the appropriate time -- i'm sorry, a -- >> that is the asian american action fund. they strongly support ranked- choice voting and support the common sense proposal to fine tune it may laurel alexians -- mayoral elections. ranked-choice voting has made it possible for asian-americans to elect representatives of their choice, a precious right guaranteed by the u.s. and california voting rights act, but the u.s. and california constitutions. asian-american communities though it was often fragmented between several candidates, which made it difficult for asian-american candidate to qualify for the runoff. after the city adopted ranked- choice voting, representation in city government has more than doubled. by enabling residents to vote in a single november e
under fire for bad behavior. the new questions surfaced about what the new york fed knew and when. >>> look at this. cue live in 300 square feet? welcome to gotham. and cheddar bay biscuits then choose one of 7 entrees plus dessert! four perfect courses, just $14.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. ♪ lord, you got no reason ♪ you got no right ♪ ♪ i find myself at the wrong place ♪ [ male announcer ] the ram 1500 express. ♪ it says a lot about you. ♪ in a deep, hemi-rumble sort of way. guts. glory. ram. >>> 86 days of hell, programs the best description of the infantry officer's training at quantico, virginia. marines are mum on the details of the course but it's believed to test the boundaries of mental and physical fitness. those who survive, they're essentially the elite of the elite. starting in september for the very first time ever, this infantry officer's training course will be open to women. greg jacobs is a former u.s. marine, policy director of the service women's action network and he's been through this ioc, this course. first, talk to me
to 227. >> john in new york, you kept a lot of the ayp approach. how did you develop the accountability approach? >> one reason we decided to keep that ayp approach was the subgroup and not wanting to move away from capping the attention and light on schools, and students of color. important to keep the focus on some groups. we didn't want to lose the right attention of nclb on whether schools are making gains towards proficiency. the other part of our strategy, accountability is not the accountability system of the district, the accountability for adults inside the schools that are in the sense of the waiver and appoint people towards the right set of standards and hold people individually accountable and give them support, getting to the target shining a light on people inside of schools and change instruction. >> i do have a concern about going forward in terms of monitoring. they are going to report desegregated data by subgroup performance of students to schools and in a publicly available way, web site information to parent and community. easy to say we move from a compliance appr
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. nora ephron died on tuesday in new york there complications from leukemia. she was 71 years old. nora got her start in the world of newspapers and soon became well-known as an essayist in the pages of esquire and "new york" magazine she established herself as one of america's funniest writer, her humor was smart, self-deprecating and perfectly timed testimony is said her true love became the movies so she began to write script force film and became a director. said to rein-- invig raised rot man particular comedy in sleepless in seattle, when harry met sallie and you've got mail. >> although herr wins got happy endings they had real thoughts and desires and aspirations. in her later years she yet best selling books with typical can -- and good humor at the process of age. she had a way of making us feel better about life's disappointments, to the by pretending they did not matter but by showing how to laugh at them. mike nichols said of her she was so funny and interesting that you didn't notice that she was also necessarim
]. so this next piece actually another one of the beautiful gems that i found in new york in a yiddish archives it's been lost for so many years. i was lucky to perform it in new york for october for a big jewish audience and people fell in love with it. it's a true story and something that still exists now. this means god watches over -- this piece a girlfriend her boyfriend goes to war and she says, i was lucking to be in love for a little while. i had love and everything i could ever want and now he's off at war and i'm alone. and i don't know what will happen after this. will he kill another mother's child. will i have to live with that? god watch over my belove ed and all the mother's sons. [music] [applause] >> so, not sure how much time we have left? keep going. all right. right? all right. so the next few pieces i wanted to tell you about. one is by [inaudible] and the other is by the same composer that did [inaudible] those conductors the father of russian music. know this song is not a song that was a yiddish it was a russian song and translated to yiddish because people lov
. as a fall mostly sunny thunderstorms may pop up and new york and denver 88 degrees for new york and 90 for denver. we look for temperatures to warm in the 1 hundreds in central valley. overnight lows in the '50s, the forecast highs for the bay and south bay mostly low 80's in san jose low 80's, 78 for los gatos, 77 at hayward, the cooler than it was today. the clinton began yesterday continues through the end of the week. by the end of the week will be in the upper seventies before warming up next weekend. >>> extra innings at the coliseum dennis o'donnell is there. >>> great debt to be a sports fan a thrilling finish at the british open and a thriller at the coliseum the a's go for this ,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,, discover british columbia. visit: >>> welcome back to a 0 dot go the oakland a's the most exciting team in baseball, they have never swept the new york yankees at home and four game series at the chance to do that today, see. c. sad that via bases loaded our poll cologne off a wall to run scored the yankees jump up to 4- 0 lead. the a's chip away. brandon inge second home run in as
headquarters in new york. good morning. >> good morning. the consumer financial protection bureau is calling for more oversight of the credit reporting companies. that includes the big three. there is inaccuracies in credit reports and the bureau director says it's been difficult to get that fixed and that the new regulations will address this. say goodbye to msnbc.com. it has been renamed after the end of a partnership. next year the cable-tv channel will debut a new internet web site. ford is recalling the escape suv because of the carpet possibly getting in the way of the brakes. we are starting to get news on apple ipad ahead of the back-to- school shopping season. details on that and next hour. that is business news for now. live a bloomberg headquarters in new york, linda bell reporting for abc 7 news. back to you. >> thank you. 4:38. >> still to come, a strange turn to an armed robbery. in prince george's robbery how one of the captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> welcome back. time for the weather. >> steve rudin. >> heat and humidity, a typical july w
for many areas of south dakota, southern wisconsin and heat advisories in place around new york, st. louis, philadelphia and portions outside of washington, d.c. today we will see 90 degrees, mid-90s from new york city down to raleigh. it's very humid so not very enjoyable. the last heat wave was dry. you weren't drenched in sweat but this is more humid. today up to 100 in minneapolis. des moines in 97. through the three-day heat wave, we should see it through wichita, mid-90s around chicago, and d.c. by the end of the heat wave has a chance of hitting near 100 degrees. that's a look at your national forecast. now here's a look at the weather outside your window. today will be very warm. we'll see a few scattered storms, areas of florida typical this time of year. if you're lucky around charlotte you'll see a shower or storm, but no luck from our friends from kansas city to indianapolis. another heat wave. we barely got done with the last one. >> you're going to sound like a broken record. >> could be every certainly. just like last year. >> don't say that, please new big ben walks up the
today in america. in new york, a car plummeted down a five-story elevator shaft. it happened at a parking garage where an attendant drove the vehicle into the elevator, thinking the lift was waiting for him. well, it was not. the car fell some 40 feet, trapping the driver and a co-worker who were pinned inside the wreckage and had to be freed by firefighters. >>> south carolina is all too familiar with the destruction of hurricanes. and a test was done there to show what can happen if buildings aren't reinforced against those heavy winds. a group that works with insurance companies put the building through 130-mile-an-hour gusts. >>> in california a man was arrested for building a secret house. this is very stealthy. the problem is he did it in a county park and tried to hide it with camouflage. but sheriff's deputies say they were impressed with how much work he put into the small cabin. he apparently had a lot of time. he installed bunk beds, medicine cabinets and bookshelves. but they weren't so thrilled with the large marijuana plants they say he was raising on his proper
't run into any trouble locating the middle of nowhere. the "new york times" put the entire episode like this. new olympic event. cameron vs. romney. romney had hoped these would be the lasting images of the day. official meetings with british leaders including cameron. >> governor, did you intend to criticize the way london has prepared for these games? >> reporter: but instead, he was forced to try to smooth things over. >> of course there will be errors from time to time, but those are all over shadowed by the extraordinary demonstrations of courage, character, and determination by the athletes. >> reporter: romney's misstep today was a reminder that everything he said on the foreign trip is going to be put under a microscope. >> reporter: tonight the controversy hasn't died down. at an olympic lighting ceremony this evening london's free speaking mayor boris johnson wasn't appeased. >> a guy called mitt romney who wants to know whether we're ready. he wants to know whether we're ready. are we ready? [ cheering ] >> yes we are! >> reporter: and today back in washington the white house
of the press for an apology. a political reporter for "new york times" reveals a dirty little secret about how to get quotes from politicians. you tube. famous for off the wall videos now becoming a trusted source for news. and there is a trip back in time to the happiest place in earth. on the panel this week judy miller, and syndicated columnist al thomas and bill pinkerton ask ellen, bureau chief. and fox news watch is on right now. >> if you're successful, someone along the lines gave you some help. there is a great teacher somewhere in your life. someone helped to create this unbelievable american system we have that allows you to thrive. someone invested roads and bridges. if you've got a business you didn't build that. someone else made that happen. >> and mr. obama words getting attention of job makers and critics. and there is a campaign with one of the call ins where journalists are able to call and listen to what they want to present. on this call there is four small business people including an african american woman that said she was at the e needed the government's help. the firs
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 7,501 (some duplicates have been removed)